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Bibliography on Women in Science

Compiled by Edith L. Taylor
University of Kansas
Biology 420/701: Seminar on Women in Science

General
Biographical and Historical Material
Book Reviews
Other Bibliographies
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General

  • Abbott, A. 1998. Plea for female academics in Germany. Nature 393: 402.
  • Abbott, A. 1999. German centre risks women-only job ads. Nature 398(6728): 550.
  • Abbott, A. 1999. Increase in German science budget a boon for women and youth. Nature 399(6733): 186.
  • Abbott, A. 1999. Europe seeks greater role for women on key advisory panels. Nature 399(6734): 290.
  • Abbott, A. 2000. Italian women meet glass ceiling in the lab. Nature 408(6815): 890-891.
  • Acker, S. 1984. Women in higher education: What is the problem? In: Is Higher Education Fair to Women? S. Acker and D.W. Piper, eds., SRHE & NFER-Nelson, pp. 25-48.
  • Acker, S. 1992. New perspectives on an old problem: the position of women academics in British higher education. Higher Education 24(1): 57-75.
  • Acker S, Feuerverger G. 1996. Doing good and feeling bad: The work of women university teachers. Cambridge Journal of Education 26(3): 401-422.
  • Acker, S. and D.W. Piper, eds. 1984. Is Higher Education Fair to Women? SRHE-NFER-Nelson, Guildford, Surrey, U.K., 244 p. [see individual papers under Acker, Dyhouse, Burstyn and Weinreich-Haste]
  • Ackerman FN. 2005. Women in science. Issues in Science and Technology 21(2): 24. [Letter to the editor in response to article by Preston, 2004]
  • Adams KE. 2003. Patient choice of provider gender. Journal of the American Medical Women's Association 58(2): 117–119.
  • Adams KE. 2003. Patient preference and provider gender (reply to Letter to the Editor). Journal of the American Medical Women's Association 58(3): 131–132. [Reply to Letter in the editor by Donohoe 2003 (original article by Adams 2003)]
  • Adams, T.L. 1998. Gender and women's employment in the male-dominated profession of dentistry: 1867–1917. Canadian Review of Sociology and Anthropology 35(1): 21–42.
  • Adams TL. 2005. Feminization of professions: The case of women in dentistry. Canadian Journal of Sociology 30(1): 71–94.
  • Adolphi, N. 1995. Shared positions a creative solution for academic couples. APS News Online, 4(11): 5. [available online: http://www.aps.org/apsnews/1295/129512.cfm APS = American Psychological Association]
  • Ainley MG. 1995. Women's work in geology: A historical perspective on gender division in Canadian science. Geoscience Canada 21(3): 140–142.
  • Ainley MG. 2000. Feminist perspectives on science and technology (syllabus). In: Building Inclusive Science: Connecting Women’s Studies and Women in Science and Engineering (S.V. Rosser, ed.), Women's Studies Quarterly 28(1-2): 207–211.
  • Aldous, P. 1994. Germany: The backbreaking work of scientist-homemakers. Science 263: 1475-1477, 1480 [Women in Science '94, special section of Science magazine, ed. by J. Benditt].
  • Aldous, P. 1994. Sweden: Leveling the playing field in Stockholm. Science 263: 1482 [Women in Science '94, special section of Science magazine, ed. by J. Benditt].
  • Alic M. 1986. Hypatia's Revenge: A History of Women in Science from Antiquity through the Nineteenth Century. Beacon Press, Boston, MA, 230 pp.
  • Alkire, R.C. (Chair), M.C. Thurnauer (Vice-Chair) and the Chemical Sciences Roundtable. 2000. Women in the Chemical Workforce: A Workshop Report to the Chemical Sciences Roundtable. Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications (CPSMA), National Research Council, National Academy Press, Washington, DC, 158 pp.
  • Allen LS, Richey MF, Chai Yee M, and Gorski RA. 1991. Sex differences in the corpus callosum of the living human being. The Journal of Neuroscience 11(4): 933–942.
  • Allmendinger J, and Hinz T. 2002. Programmierte (Un-)Gliechheit? (Programmed (in-)equality?). Zeitschrift für Soziologie 31(4): 275–293.
  • Alper, J. 1993. The pipeline is leaking women all the way along. Science 260(5106): 409–411.
  • Amancio L. 2005. Reflections on science as a gendered endeavour: Changes and continuities. Social Science Information 44(1): 65–83.
  • Amano, Masako. 1997. Women in higher education. Higher Education 34(2): 215–235. [an examination of higher education for women in Japan]
  • Amato, I. 1992. Profile of a field: Chemistry. Women have extra hoops to jump through. Science 255: 1372–1373. [filed with Benditt, 1992]
  • American Association of University Professors (AAUP), Committee W on the Status of Women in the Academic Profession. 1993. Salary-setting practices that unfairly disadvantage women faculty. In: Women in Higher Education: A Feminist Perspective, Glazer JS, Bensimon EM, Townsend BK, eds., Ginn Press, Needham Heights, MA, pp. 365–370.
  • American Association of University Professors (AAUP). 2001. Statement of Principles on Family Responsibilities and Academic Work. American Association of University Professors, ~11 pp.
  • American Association of University Women (AAUW). 1992. How Schools Shortchange Girls: The AAUW Report. A study of major findings on girls and education commissioned by the AAUW Educational Foundation; researched by the Wellesley College Center for Research on Women. AAUW Educational Foundation and National Education Association, Washington, DC, 116 pp.
  • American Association of University Women Educational Foundation. 1993. Hostile hallways: The AAUW survey on sexual harassment in America's schools. Researched by: Louis Harris and Associates, Inc., AAUW Educational Foundation, Washington, DC, 25 pp.
  • American Association of University Women (AAUW), Educational Foundation. 1995. Growing Smart: What’s Working for Girls in School. Executive Summary and Action Guide. AAUW Educational Foundation, Washington, DC, 48 pp. [ILL]
  • American Association of University Women (AAUW). 1998. Gender Gaps: Where Schools Still Fail our Children. AAUW Educational Foundation and National Education Association, Washington, DC, 150 pp. [Measures schools' mixed progress toward gender equity and excellence since the 1992 publication of How Schools Shortchange Girls. Report compares student course enrollments, tests, grades, risks, and resiliency by race and class as well as by gender. It finds some gains in girls' achievement, some areas where boys—not girls—lag, and some areas, like technology, where needs have not yet been addressed.]
  • American Association of University Women (AAUW), Educational Foundation. 1998. Separated by Sex: A Critical Look at Single-Sex Education for Girls. AAUW Educational Foundation, Washington, DC, 101 pp. [ILL]
  • American Association of University Women (AAUW), Educational Foundation. 1999. Gaining a Foothold: Women’s Transitions through Work and College. AAUW Educational Foundation, Washington, DC, 100 pp. [ILL]
  • American Chemical Society, Committee on Economic and Professional Affairs, R. Ellis, and M.W. Jordan. 2001. Academic Chemists 2000—A Decade of Change: 1990–2000. American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, 38 pp.
  • American Chemical Society, Women Chemist Committee Committee on Economic and Professional Affairs, K.Y. Kreeger, and M.W. Jordan. 2001. Women Chemists 2000: Analysis of the American Chemical Society’s Comprehensive 2000 Survey of the Salaries and Employment Status of its Domestic Members. American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, 50 pp., 1 appendix.
  • American Chemical Society, Committee on Economic and Professional Affairs, P. Broyles and M. Jordan. 2002. Early Careers of Chemists: A Report on the American Chemical Society’s Study of Members under age 40. American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, 40 pp.
  • American Council on Education, Office of Women in Higher Education. 2005. An Agenda for Excellence: Creating Flexibility in Tenure-Track Faculty Careers (Executive Summary). American Council on Education, Washington, DC, 12 pp.
  • Amram, F. 1984. The innovative woman. New Scientist (24 May, No. 1411): 10–12. [Troubles facing women inventors. Inventions of women. Some is not truly science, but is still interesting.]
  • Amsterdam, A., R.M. Nissen, Z. Sun, E.C. Swindell, S. Farrington and N. Hopkins. 2004. Identification of 315 genes essential for early zebrafish development. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 101(35): 12792–12797. ["an inaugural article by members of the National Academy of Sciences elected on April 20, 2004" on Dr. Nancy Hopkins research.]
  • Anderson A. 1989. Still a soft female touch for doctorates . Nature 340(6233): 417. [on the number of women obtaining Ph.D.s in the US]
  • Anderson BT. 1993. Minority females in the science pipeline-Activities to enhance readiness, recruitment, and retention. Initiatives 55(3): 31–38.
  • Anderson C. 1992. Promotion of women physicians in academic medicine: Glass ceiling or sticky floor? Journal of the American Medical Association 273(13): 1022–1025.
  • Anderson C. 1992. NIH aims at 'glass ceiling'. Nature 356: 6.
  • Anderson MW, Grimwade A, and Tamkins T. 2004. Annual life sciences salary survey. The Scientist 2004(Sept. 27): 15–19.
  • Anderson S. 2005. Harvard by the numbers—women in the sciences. Harvard Magazine (Sept-Oct) 108(1): 73. [a chart of the numbers of women students and faculty at Harvard University, from undergraduates to professors-taken from the report of the University Task Force on Women in Science and Engineering at Harvard]
  • Andrew LB, and Bickel J. 1998. Gender issues in physician career development. Career Planning and Adult Development Journal 14: 105–122.
  • Angier, N. 2003. No parity yet, but science academy gains more women. New York Times, Tuesday, May 6, 2003, Science Times, p. 2. [an article on the election of 17 women, almost 25% of the total, to the National Academy of Sciences]
  • Angier, N. 2002. Women join the ranks of science but remain invisible at the top. In: The Gender of Science (J.A. Kourany, ed.), Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, pp. 75-78 [reprinted from the New York Times, May 21, 1991]
  • Angler, N. 2002. Women join the ranks of science but remain invisible at the top. In: The Gender of Science (J.A. Kourany, ed.), Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, pp. 75–78.
  • Anonymous. 1983. Women in science in the United Kingdom. Nature 302(5903): 9. [a chart of the numbers of women in various science disciplines in Great Britain]
  • Anonymous. 1992. 'Glass ceiling' is real for women engineers. Engineering News-Record 229(11): 27.
  • Anonymous. 1992. The glass ceiling might as well be steel. Engineering News-Record 229(11): 98.
  • Anonymous. 1992. Women in science: Discrimination against women in science is wrong but so is a quota system. Nature 359(6391): 92. [editorial; Also see letters to the editor in response to this editorial: Engel J et al.; Hogan B; and Osborn M, all Nature 1992]
  • Anonymous. 1993. Confronting medicine's glass ceiling. American Medical News 36: 17.
  • Anonymous. 1995. Women in science. Chemistry in Britain 31(8): 597. [on a British governmental white paper, ‘Realising our Potential,’ on the future employment of women in science]
  • Anonymous. 1995. Program to encourage women in science. Geotimes 40(11): 10. [on the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation grant to the University of Michigan to establish a program to improve recruitment and retention of women graduate students.]
  • Anonymous. 1998. China's 'eugenics' law still disturbing despite relabelling. Nature 394 (6695): 707 [Editorial on family planning laws in China]
  • Anonymous. 1999. Tenure in a chilly climate. Political Science and Politics 32(1): 91–100. [written by 2 women faculty members, who preferred to remain anonymous.]
  • Anonymous. 1999. How to boost the careers of women in science? Nature 401(6749): 99. [editorial on an international web debate on the scarcity of women in research]
  • Anonymous. 2000. DOE aim to increase women in science. Chemical and Engineering News 78(37): 17.
  • Anonymous. 2000. Affirmative action ignored. Nature 404(6780): 795 [editorial on a report by the U.S. National Science and Technology Council on under-representation in the science and technology workforce]
  • Anonymous. 2000. From Marie Stopes to strawberry condoms. Nursing Times 96(6): 21. [on the history of family planning in Great Britain; Marie Stopes opened the first birth control clinic in England.]
  • Anonymous. 2000. Sex and science. The Lancet 355: 1287. [An editorial on women in clinical science in the UK, and the opening of a new science building at King’s College, London, which is named the Franklin- Wilkins building in honor of Rosalind Franklin and Maurice Wilkins, who both worked at King’s College]
  • Anonymous. 2001. Japan and its women. Nature 410(6827): 395 ["Cultural obstacles and potential damage to one's career present major challenges to women wanting to pursue science in Japan. Some changes have occurred, but too few, and too slowly." - Editorial]
  • Anonymous. 2001. Staff survey shows women feel out in the cold at Caltech. Nature 412: 844 [includes editorial in same issue of Nature, p. 841].
  • Anonymous. 2001. Keeping women in hospital and academic medicine (Editorial). Lancet 358(9276): 83.
  • Anonymous. 2001. Women in science: International perspectives. Minerva 39(2): 151. [Introduction to a special issue, ‘Women in science: International perspectives,’ ed. by H. Etzkowitz H, and C. Kemelgor - see individual papers by Fuchs et al.; Plonski and Saidel; Kuwahara]
  • Anonymous. 2002. Women in science. The Veterinary Record 151(23): 681.
  • Anonymous. 2002. The role of gender in healthcare communication. Patient Education and Counseling 48: 199–200.
  • Anonymous. 2002. Women don't want to be "one of the boys." Nature 416: 663 ["At the top of Japan's scientific establishment, women are faced with a past they thought they had escaped."]
  • Anonymous. 2003. Feminism: Yes, you are: So much for the dress code. Gaea (Newsletter of the Association for Women Geoscientists) 26(5): 7–8. [on the definition of ‘feminism’]
  • Anonymous. 2003. Patient preference and provider gender. Journal of the American Medical Women's Association 58(3): 131–132.
  • Anonymous. 2004. ENWISE, Enlarge Women in Science to East. Nouvelles Questions Féministes 23(2): 122–126. [a report of a group on the situation for women in science in central and eastern Europe]
  • Anonymous. 2005. Action, not words. Nature 436(7048): 151. [on women in science in Japan]
  • Anonymous. 2005. What is the status of embryos?. New Scientist 187(2513): 5. [Editorial on the British government developing new rules on human embryos to keep up with new technologies.]
  • Anonymous. 2005. Tenure and gender. Harvard Magazine 107(3): 64–68. [on the low number of women that have been offered tenure in science at Harvard]
  • Anonymous. 2005. Excerpts from Harvard leader's remarks. The New York Times, February 18, 2005, p. A20. [On remarks made on the lack of women in science by the president of Harvard, Lawrence Summers, in January 2004; see full text of the speech under Summers, 2005]
  • Anonymous. 2005. The revenge of Ellen Swallow. The New York Times, February 20, 2005, sec. 4, p. 8. [On remarks made on the lack of women in science by the president of Harvard, Lawrence Summers, in January 2004; see full text of the speech under Summers, 2005]
  • Anonymous. 2005. All things equal (editorial). Nature 437(7057): 296. [‘Lack of affordable child care is a major impediment to women’s careers, in science as elsewhere.’ Also see letter to the editor in response to this editorial, by Zuk and Rosenquist, 2005]
  • Anonymous. 2006. Why grad students succed or fail. Insidehighered.com news 2006(Feb. 16): 6 pp. [http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2006/02/16/grad]
  • Anonymous. 2006. A look at minority and female doctorate recipients. The Chronicle of Higher Education 53(6): B16-B17.
  • Applegate, J., L. Drotning, N. Gajee, J. Howard, K. Kastens, J. Metcalfe, D. Partridge, M.P. Rodriguez and J. Winsten. 2001. Advancement of women through the academic ranks of The Columbia University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences: Where are the leaks in the pipeline? http://senate.columbia.edu/annual_reports/01-02/Pipeline2a_as_dist.doc.pdf 39 pp.
  • Arenson, K.W. 2005. Little advance is seen in Ivies' hiring of minorities and women. The New York Times, March 1, 2005, p. A13. [on the report, “The (Un)Changing Face of the Ivy League” by the Graduate Employees and Students Organization (GESO) of Yale (see below)]
  • Armour M, Tovell D. 2006. Transitions. In: Success Strategies for Women in Science: A Portable Mentor, Pritchard PA, eds., Elsevier Academic Press, Burlington, MA, pp. 283–304.
  • Ashley, G. 2003. Gail Ashley: Outstanding educator encourages tenure change. Geotimes 48(2): 32. [Dr. Ashley is a geoscientist; this article is on the timing of tenure versus women's personal lives.]
  • Ashmore, S.E., L.A. Harvey and C. Runciman. 1992. Scientific assistants: contributions and gender issues. Search 23(8): 239–241.
  • Ashraf, J. 1996. The influence of gender on faculty salaries in the United States, 1969–1989. Applied Economics 28(7): 857–864.
  • Aspray, W., and A. Bernat. 2002. Retaining students in your graduate program. Science Next Wave, 14 June 2002, 4 pp. [http://nextwave.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2002/06/13/12? [on mentoring minority students in graduate school]
  • Association for Women in Science. 1995. Taking the Initiative: Report on a Leadership Conference for Women in Science and Technology. Association for Women in Science, AWIS, Washington, DC, 39 pp.
  • Association for Women in Science. 2000. Focus: Women scientists and the National Science Foundation—celebrating 50 years. AWIS Magazine 29(2): 6-33 [includes articles on Rita Colwell, first female director of the NSF, women and the information revolution, and minority women scientists at NSF].
  • Association for Women in Science (AWIS). 2002. Individual Latina voices: Excerpts from the 2002 edition of A Hand Up. AWIS Magazine 31(3): 11–21.
  • Astin, H.S. 1991. Citation classics: Women's and men's perceptions of their contributions to science. In: The Outer Circle: Women in the Scientific Community (H. Zuckerman, J.R. Cole and J.R. Bruer, eds.), W.W. Norton & Company, NY, pp. 57–76.
  • Astin HS, and Davis DE. 1993. Research productivity across the life and career cycles: Facilitators and barriers for women. In: Women in Higher Education: A Feminist Perspective, Glazer JS, Bensimon EM, Townsend BK, eds., Ginn Press, Needham Heights, MA, pp. 415–423.
  • Astin HS, and Leland C. 1993. In the spirit of the times: Three generations of women leaders. In: Women in Higher Education: A Feminist Perspective, Glazer JS, Bensimon EM, Townsend BK, eds., Ginn Press, Needham Heights, MA, pp. 493–506. [Reprinted from: Women of Influence, Women of Vision: A Cross-Generational Study of Leaders and Social Change. Astin HS and Leland C, Jossey-Bass Inc., 1991]
  • Astin, H.S., and J.F. Milem. 1996. The status of academic couples in US institutions. AWIS Magazine 25(4): 12-14 [part of a special issue on dual career couples]
  • Atlas J. 2005. The battle behind the battle at Harvard. The New York Times, February 27, sec. 4, p. 14. [On remarks made on the lack of women in science by the president of Harvard, Lawrence Summers, in January 2004; see full text of the speech under Summers, 2005]
  • Austin, L.S. 2000. What’s Holding you Back? 8 Critical Choices for Women’s Success. Basic Books, New York, NY, 230 pp. [includes information on the glass ceiling, competition and suggestions for women to succeed]
  • Austin J. 2005. The class of 2005. United States: Two scientists and a baby. Science 310: 518–519. [on two women scientists and their job search.]
  • Babco, E.L. 2000. Limited progress: the status of Hispanic Americans in science and engineering. Commission of Professional in Science and Technology, Washington, DC, 27 pp.
  • Babco, E.L. 2003. Trends in African American and Native American participation in STEM higher education. Commission on Professionals in Science and Technology, Washington, DC, 10 pp.
  • Babco, E.L. 2003. The status of Native Americans in science and engineering. Commission on Professionals in Science and Technology, Washington, DC, 7 pp.
  • Babco, E.L., and J.K. Jesse. 2003 What does the future of the scientific labor market look like? Looking back and looking forward. Commission on Professionals in Science and Technology, Washington, DC, 23 pp.
  • Babco EL, and Jesse JK. 2005. Employment in the life sciences: A mixed outlook. BioScience 55(10): 879–886.
  • Babcock, L., and S. Laschever. 2003. Women Don’t Ask: Negotiation and the Gender Divide. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, 223 pp. [Written by an economist and a writer, this book summarizes research on gender differences in attitudes toward negotiation and outcomes, and offers some suggestions to women in negotiations.]
  • Back T, Bishop D, Bonanno R, Budil KS, Cromwell KO, Dube E, Gerich C, Lane MA, Lamph JA, Matarazzo C, Monson N, Pico TM, Schleich D, Stoddard MC, Turpin L, von Holtz E, and Walling RS. 2000. Attracting and Retaining Technical Women—What Works? Strategies within—Forging New Realities for Women in Science, Engineering, and Technology. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, 32 pp. [a report issued to the Commission on the Advancement of Women and Minorities in Science, Engineering and Technology Development (CAWMSET);
  • Bae, Y., S. Choy, C. Geddes, J. Sable and T. Snyder. 2000. Trends in Educational Equity of Girls and Women. National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education, Washington, DC, NCES 2000-030, 99 pp. [statistical data, including many graphs and charts of education by gender] (KU library)
  • Bagilhole, B. 1993. How to keep a good woman down: an investigation of the role of institutional factors in the process of discrimination against women academics. British Journal of Sociology of Education 14(3): 261–274.
  • Bagilhole, B. 1993. Survivors in a male preserve: A study of British women academics' experiences and perceptions of discrimination in a UK university. Higher Education 26(4): 431–447.
  • Baierl E. 2004. Why is life expectancy longer for women than it is for men? Scientific American 291(6): 120.
  • Bailey, S.M., P.B. Campbell, B.C. Clewell, J. Garbarino, P. Hersch, M. Kimmel, L. Phillips, W. Pollack and B. Thorne, participants. 2001. Beyond the “Gender Wars.” A Conversation about Girls, Boys, and Education. American Association of University Women Educational Foundation, Washington, DC, 58 pp. [ILL]
  • Bailyn L. 2003. Academic careers and gender equity: Lessons learned from MIT. Gender, Work and Organization 10(2): 137–153.
  • Baker, B. 2000. Recruiting minorities to the biological sciences. BioScience 50(3): 191–195. ["Biologists are trying a range of approaches to diversify their field."]
  • Baker, D.P., and D.P. Jones. 1992. Opportunity and performance: A sociological explanation for gender differences in academic mathematics. In: Education and Gender Equality (J. Wrigley, ed.), The Falmer Press, London, UK, pp. 193–203.
  • Baker M. 2003. Prarie to presidency: Women change the face of Texas medicine. Texas Medicine 99(1): 61-66 Baker, M.A. 2007. Diversity in the geosciences—We can do better. Geotimes 52(1): 17,47.
  • Baker P, Copp M. 1997. Gender matters most: The interaction of gendered expectations, feminist course content, and pregnancy in student course evaluations. Teaching Sociology 25(1): 29–43.
  • Baker, P., B. Shulman and E.H. Tobin. 2001. Difficult crossings: Stories from building two-way streets. In: Feminist Science Studies: A New Generation (M. Mayberry, B. Subramaniam and L.H. Weasel, eds.), Routledge, New York, NY, pp. 157–172. [on a project to build scientific literacy among women faculty at Bates College, i.e., to include science in women’s studies and feminism in science]
  • Baker, S.M. 1999. Success for women in academia: Choices, experiences, and challenges. In: Women in Science and Engineering: Choices for Success (C.C. Selby, ed.), Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 869: 210–218. [papers from a conference held in 1998]
  • Bakken LL, Sheridan J, and Carnes M. 2003. Gender differences among physician-scientists in self- assessed abilities to perform clinical research. Academic Medicine 78(12): 1281–1286.
  • Balarat, P. 1999. Women in science. Current Science 77(7): 841–842. [editorial]
  • Banner LW. 2003. Mannish women, passive men, and constitutional types: Margaret Mead's Sex and Temperament in Three Primitive Societies as a response to Ruth Benedict's Patterns of Culture. Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 28(3): 833–858. [Margaret Mead and Ruth Benedict were both early anthropologists]
  • Bar-Haim G, and Wilkes JM. 1989. A cognitive interpretation of the marginality and underrepresentation of women in science. The Journal of Higher Education 60(4): 371–387.
  • Barad, K. 1995. A feminist approach to teaching quantum physics. In: Teaching the Majority: Breaking the Gender Barrier in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering (S.V. Rosser, ed.), Teachers College Press, New York, NY, pp. 43–75.
  • Barber, A.L. 1995. U.S. women in science and engineering, 1960–1990. Progress toward equity? Journal of Higher Education 66(2): 213–235. [in part a personal story of working toward a Ph.D. in molecular biology, but also includes data on numbers of women in science]
  • Barbezat, D.A. 1987. Salary differentials by sex in the academic labor market. Journal of Human Resources 22(3): 422–428.
  • Barbezat, D.A. 1989. The effect of collective bargaining on salaries in higher education. Industrial and Labor Relations Review 42(3): 443–455.
  • Bardell, E.B. 1984. America's only school of pharmacy for women. Pharmacy in History 26(3): 127-133 [on the Louisville School of Pharmacy, which opened in 1883]
  • Barinaga, M. 1992. Profile of a field: Neuroscience. The pipeline is leaking. Science 255: 1366–1367. (Filed with Benditt, 1992). Barinaga, M. 1993. Is there a female 'style' in science? Science 260(5106): 384–391.
  • Barinaga, M. 1993. Feminists find gender everywhere in science. Science 260(5106): 392–393.
  • Barinaga, M. 1994. Surprises across the cultural divide. Science 263: 1468-1469, 1472. [statistics and comparisons on the incidence of women in science cross-culturally. Chart of women faculty in physics by country worldwide. Article in one of Science magazine's "Women in Science" issues, edited by J. Benditt.]
  • Barinaga, M. 1996. Backlash strikes at affirmative action programs. Science 271: 1908–1910. ["New rulings cast doubt on efforts to encourage diversity in science." Part of a special issue on women and minorities edited by E. Culotta]
  • Barinaga, M. 2000. Soft money's hard realities. Science 289: 2024–2028. [" 'Second-class citizen' is how researchers on soft money, who have to raise their salaries from grants, describe their position. It can be fraught with financial insecurity, disrespect, and poor facilities—as well as some advantages." There are a disproportionate number of women in soft-money positions.]
  • Barnett, R., and C. Rivers. 2004. Same Difference: How Gender Myths Are Hurting Our Relationships, Our Children, and Our Jobs. Basic Books, New York, NY, 289 pp.
  • Baron-Cohen, S. 2003. Sugar and spice. New Scientist 178(2396): 54. [On gender differences, brain differences and the psychology of women.]
  • Barr, E.S. 1992. The experience of women pediatric dental residents: a survey. Pediatric Dentistry 14(2): 100–104.
  • Barres, BA. 2005. Arrogance imperils plans for change at Harvard. Nature 434: 697.
  • Barres, BA. 2006. Does gender matter?. Nature 442: 133–136. [on the suggestion that women do not excel in science due to a lack of innate ability and why this theory is not true]
  • Barry, S. 2002. The role of women in the veterinary profession. Irish Veterinary Journal 55(11): 558–559.
  • Bart, J., editor 2000. Women Succeeding in the Sciences: Theories and Practices Across Disciplines. Purdue University Press, West Lafayette, IN, 277 pp. [see individual papers].
  • Barton AC, Osborne MD. 2000. Building inclusive science in classrooms through oral histories. In: Building Inclusive Science: Connecting Women’s Studies and Women in Science and Engineering (S.V. Rosser, ed.), Women's Studies Quarterly 28(1-2): 236–250.
  • Bartsch I. 2000. Women, gender, and science: The need for orbitals in higher education (with syllabus). In: Building Inclusive Science: Connecting Women’s Studies and Women in Science and Engineering (S.V. Rosser, ed.), Women's Studies Quarterly 28(1-2): 264–269.
  • Basow SA. 1995. Student evaluations of college professors: When gender matters. Journal of Educational Psychology 87(4): 656–665.
  • Basow, S.A. 1998. Student evaluations: The role of gender bias and teaching styles. In: Career Strategies for Women in Academe: Arming Athena (L.H. Collins, J.C. Chrisler, K. Quina, eds.), SAGE Publications, Thousand Oaks, CA, pp. 135–156.
  • Bauer, C.C., and B.B. Baltes. 2002. Reducing the effects of gender stereotypes on performance evaluations. Sex Roles 47(9/10): 465–476.
  • Baum LG. 2006. Women editors: Change comes from focused action (Letter to the editor). Nature 441: 812. [Response to article by Dalton 2006, ‘Societies spurn women editors.’]
  • Bayer AE, Astin HS. 1975. Sex differentials in the academic reward system. Science 188(4190): 796–802. [a review of rates of promotion, salaries, etc. for men vs. women in academia]
  • BBC News. 2005. Charter help for women scientists. BBC News World Edition, on-line June 23, 2005, http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/science/nature/4116056.stm, 2 pp.
  • Beans, B.E. 1999. Mentoring program helps young faculty feel at home. APA Monitor Online 30(3): 4 pp. (March 1999), http://www.apa.org/monitor/mar99/mentor.html [on mentoring junior faculty]
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  • Wolf-Wendel LE, Baker BD, and Morphew CC. 2000. Dollars and $ense: Institutional resources and the baccalaureate origins of women doctorates. The Journal of Higher Education 71(2): 165–186.
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  • Wolfe, C.C. 1999. Number of women faculty in the geosciences increasing, but slowly. Eos (Transactions, American Geophysical Union) 80(12): 133, 136.
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  • Wylie, A. 2002. The engendering of archaeology: Refiguring feminist science studies. In: The Gender of Science (J.A. Kourany, ed.), Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, pp. 203-218 [reprinted from Osiris 12: 80-99, 1997]
  • Xie, Y., and K. Shauman. 1998. Sex differences in research productivity: New evidence about an old puzzle. American Sociological Review 63: 847–870.
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  • Xie, Y., and K.A. Shauman. 2003. Women in Science: Career Processes and Outcomes. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA, 318 pp. [this book covers women’s careers in science from high school to graduate school and beyond. They analyze a large amount of data on gender differences in science and engineering and discuss probable causes.]
  • Yang, J. 2002. China debates big drop in women physics majors. Science 295: 263 ["Women made up more than one-third of the physics majors at top Chinese universities in the 1970s. Now their numbers are far below those in the West. What happened?"]
  • Yarrison-Rice, J.M. 1995. On the problem of making science attractive for women and minorities: An annotated bibliography. American Journal of Physics 63(3): 203-211 [ 20 references with comments on their contents]
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  • Zuckerman, H., J.R. Cole and J.T. Bruer, eds. 1991. The Outer Circle: Women in the Scientific Community. W.W. Norton & Company, NY, 351 pp. [includes 10 articles plus 3 interviews with living scientists. The articles are on productivity of women scientists, careers of men vs. women scientists, discrimination, and barriers to women's careers in science. See individual articles under Astin; Bielby; Cole and Fiorentine; Cole and Singer; Epstein; Fox; Keller; Zuckerman]
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  • Zuk, M. 2002. Sexual Selections : What We Can and Can't Learn about Sex from Animals. University of California Press, Berkeley, CA, 239 pp. [a review of animal behavioral research, especially how the researchers’ cultural biases can affect their observation of animals. See review by Eakin, 2002]
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  • Zumeta, W., and J.S. Raveling. 2002. The best and brightest for science: Is there a problem here? Commission on Professionals in Science and Technology, Washington, DC, 20 pp.
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Biographical and Historical Material

  • Abir-Am, P.G. 1987. Synergy or clash: Disciplinary and marital strategies in the career of mathematical biologist Dorothy Wrinch. In: Uneasy Careers and Intimate Lives: Women in Science, 1789-1979 (P.G. Abir-Am and D. Outram, eds.), Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ, pp. 239–280.
  • Abir-Am, P.G. 1996. Collaborative couples who wanted to change the world: The social policies and personal tensions of the Russells, the Myrdals, and the Mead-Batesons. In: Creative Couples in the Sciences (H.M. Pycior, N.G. Slack, and P.G. Abir-Am, eds.), Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ, pp. 267–281. [Dora and Bertrand Russell and Alva and Gunnar Myrdal were social philosophers; Margaret Mead and Gregory Bateson were anthropologists.]
  • Abir-Am, P.G., and D. Outram, eds. 1987. Uneasy Careers and Intimate Lives: Women in Science, 1789–1979. Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ, 365 pp. [see individual papers under Abir-Am, Ainley, Kidwell, Kohlstedt, Morantz-Sanchez, Ogilvie, Pycior, and Shteir]
  • Abir-Am., P.G., H.M. Pycior, and N.G. Slack. 1996. Appendix: Additional collaborative couples and other cross-gender collaborators. In: Creative Couples in the Sciences (H.M. Pycior, N.G. Slack, and P.G. Abir- Am, eds.), Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ, pp. 283–288.
  • Abram, R. 1985. Send Us a Lady Physician: Women Doctors in America 1835–1920. W.W. Norton and Company, NY, 255 pp.
  • Abrams, L. 1949. Alice Eastwood—western botanist. Pacific Discovery 2: 14-17 [Eastwood was a botanist who worked on the systematics of the Liliaceae (lily family)]
  • Ainley, M.G. 1987. Field work and family: North American women ornithologists, 1900–1950. In: Uneasy Careers and Intimate Lives: Women in Science, 1789-1979 (P.G. Abir-Am and D. Outram, eds.), Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ, pp. 60–76.
  • Ainley, M.G. 1990. Last in the field? Canadian women natural scientists, 1815–1965. In: Despite the Odds: Essays on Canadian Women and Science (M.G. Ainley, ed.), Véhicule Press, Montréal, pp. 25–62.
  • Ainley, M.G. 1996. Marriage and scientific work in twentieth-century Canada: The Berkeleys in marine biology and the Hoggs in astronomy. In: Creative Couples in the Sciences (H.M. Pycior, N.G. Slack, and P.G. Abir-Am, eds.), Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ, pp. 143–155.
  • Ajzenberg-Selove, Fa. 1994. A Matter of Choices: Memoirs of a Female Physicist. Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ, 234 pp.
  • Alcamo, I.E. 1997. Gertrude Belle Elion (1918- ). In: Women in the Biological Sciences: A Biobibliographic Sourcebook (L.S. Grinstein, C.A. Biermann, R.K. Rose, eds.), Greenwood Press, CT, pp. 143–149.
  • Aldrich, M.L. 1990. Women in geology. In: Women of Science: Righting the Record (G. Kass-Simon and P. Farnes, eds.), Indiana University Press, Bloomington, IN, pp. 42–71.
  • Aldrich, M.L., and A.E. Leviton. 2001. Orra White Hitchcock (1796-1863) geological illustrator: Another belle of Amherst. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs 33(6): 246. [abstract]
  • Alic, M. 1981. Women and technology in ancient Alexandria: Maria and Hypatia. Women’s Studies International Quarterly 4(3): 305–312. [In ancient Egypt, Maria the Jewess was one of the founders of alchemy and Hypatia was a mathematician as well as a designer of scientific instruments.]
  • Alic, M. 1986. Hypatia's Heritage: A History of Women in Science from Antiquity to the Late Nineteenth Century. Beacon Press, Boston, MA, 230 pp.
  • Allen, D.E. 1978. The first woman pteridologist. British Pteridological Society Bulletin 1978: 247–249. [Margaretta Hopper was a British botanist who studied ferns.]
  • Allen, D.E. 1980. The women members of the Botanical Society of London, 1836–1856. The British Journal for the History of Science 13(45): 240–254.
  • Allen N. 1992. Australian women in science: Two unorthodox careers. Women's Studies International Forum 15(5/6): 551–562. [on Helen Newton Turner, an animal geneticist, and Isobel Bennett, a marine biologist]
  • Allen, S. 1995. 2 Americans, German share medicine Nobel. Boston Globe 10/10/95, Tuesday, City Edition, p. 3 [Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard is the German. The three won for their work on Drosophila genetics] (see also article by Henahan).
  • Ambrose, S.A., K.L. Dunkle, B.B. Lazarus, I. Nair and D.A. Harkus. 1997. Journeys of Women in Science and Engineering: No Universal Constants. Temple University Press, Philadelphia, PA, 461 pp. [First-person profiles of 88 women derived from interviews conducted by an interdisciplinary team; includes photos of most. (A good source for information on living scientists). Includes a profile of Margaret N. Rees, Antarctic geologist (and KU grad.!), pp. 308-313 (see entry under Rees, P.)]
  • Anderson, L.G. 1939. Elizabeth Garrett Anderson, 1836-1917, by her daughter, Louisa Garrett Anderson. Faber and Faber Ltd., London, 338 p. Andriole, V.T. 1959. Florence Rena Sabin—teacher, scientist, citizen. Journal of the History of Medicine 14: 320–350. [Dr. Sabin was a medical researcher and advocate for public health in the state of Colorado.]
  • Anonymous. 1907. Miss Clara Eaton Cummings (obituary). Science 25(628): 77–78. [Cummings was a botanist and faculty member at Wellesley College.]
  • Anonymous. 1910. Elizabeth Blackwell (obituary). The Lancet 1(4528): 1657–1658. [Dr. Blackwell was the first woman to graduate from a U.S. medical school.]
  • Anonymous. 1918. Miss Ethel Sargant (obituary). Nature 100 (2518): 428–429. [Ethel Sargant was a British botanist who specialized in studies of the monocots (lilies and their relatives)]
  • Anonymous. 1994. Black women firsts: Pioneers in the struggle for racial and gender equality. Ebony 49(5): 1077.
  • Anonymous. 1999. Governor Pataki nominates Dr. Novello as Health Commissioner. Press release from New York State governor's office, June 3, 1999. Taken from: http://www.state.ny.us/governor/press/year99/june3_99.htm [Dr. Antonia Novello was the first woman and first Hispanic to be Surgeon General of the US. She became New York State Health Commissioner after serving as Surgeon General.]
  • Anonymous. 2000. Florence Sabin, Professor. Child Life 79(16): 26. [Dr. Sabin was a medical researcher and advocate for public health in the state of Colorado.]
  • Anonymous. 2003. Rosalind Franklin: The woman behind the DNA helix. Chemistry and Industry 2003(8): 13.
  • Anonymous. 2003. First Person—Lynn Margulis. The Scientist 17(13): 11 [an interview with Dr. Margulis, a proponent of the theory of endosymbiosis for the origin of eukaryotic cells]
  • Anonymous. 2004. Inventive minds. New Scientist 182(2443): 46. [on inventors, including Isabella Karle, who made advances in X-ray crystallography methods]
  • Anonymous. 2007. Shirley Ann Jackson, leader in higher education and government, to recieve Vannevar Bush Award. National Science Foundation Press Release 07-032: 3 pp. [Dr. Jackson is a nuclear physicist who is currently the president of Rennselaer Polytechnic Institute in NY. She is an African-American.]
  • Anonymous. 2007. ACM names first women to recieve Turing Award. ACM Press Release: 2 pp.
  • Antony, T.T. 1997. Rebecca Craighill Lancefield (1895-1981). In: Women in the Biological Sciences: A Biobibliographic Sourcebook (L.S. Grinstein, C.A. Biermann, R.K. Rose, eds.), Greenwood Press, CT, pp. 266–273.
  • Appel, D. 2002. Aspirations in science and civics. Scientific American 286(3): 38–39. [”From the carbon- nanotube lab to the corridors of Washington power, Mildred S. Dresselhaus has followed a career that combines scientific research with public service.” Dr. Dresselhaus, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, is a physicist at M.I.T.]
  • Appel, T.A. 1994. Physiology in American women’s colleges: The rise and decline of a female subculture. Isis 85(1): 26-56 (reprinted in History of Women in the Sciences, S.G. Kohlstedt, ed., 1999, pp. 305-335) Apple, R.D. 1987. Mothers and Medicine: A Social History of Infant Feeding, 1890–1950. The University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, WI (Wisconsin Publications in the History of Science and Medicine, No. 7), 261 pp.
  • Apple, R.D., editor. 1990. Women, Health and Medicine in America: A Historical Handbook. Garland Publishing, Inc., New York, 380 pp. [includes 20 articles plus an extensive bibliography; see individual entries under Baer, Beardsley, Bogdan, Borst, Higby, Litoff, Lynaugh, Morantz-Sanchez, Poirier, Tomes, and Morman et al.]
  • Arber, A. 1919. Obituary: Ethel Sargant, October 28, 1863—January 16, 1918. New Phytologist 18(3/4): 120–128. [Ethel Sargant was a British botanist who specialized in studies of the monocots (lilies and their relatives)]
  • Arber, M.A., and W.T. Stearn. 1968. List of published works of Agnes Arber, E.A.N. Arber and Ethel Sargant (by M.A. Arber) and Biographical notes (by W.T. Stern). Journal of the Society for the Bibliography of Natural History 4(7): 370–384. [The Arbers and Ethel Sargant were botanists. Agnes Arber is known for her theories of plant morphology.]
  • Arber MM. 1974. Emily Dix, D.Sc. Proceedings of the Geologists' Association 85: 144–145. [Emily Dix was a British paleobotanist who worked on Carboniferous (coal age) floras.]
  • Arnold, L.B. 1984. Four Lives in Science: Women's Education in the Nineteenth Century. Schocken Books, NY, 179 pp. [includes information on Maria Martin Bachman, Almira Hart Lincoln Phelps, Louisa C. Allen Gregory, Florence Bascom, Eunice Foot and others].
  • Arnold LB. 1999. Becoming a geologist: Florence Bascom in Wisconsin, 1874–1887. Earth Sciences History 18(2): 159–179. [Bascom, 1962-1945, was a petrologist and field geologist]
  • Arnold, L.B. 2000. Becoming a geologist: Florence Bascom and Johns Hopkins, 1888–1895. Earth Sciences History 19(1): 2–25.
  • Arouni AJ, and Rich EC. 2003. Physician gender and patient care. Journal of Gender-Specific Medicine 6(1): 24–30.
  • Arthur CR, Saenz R, and Replogle WH. 2003. Breastfeeding education, treatment, and referrals by female physicians. Journal of Human Lactation 19(3): 303–309.
  • Ashby, R., and D.G. Ohrn, eds. 1995. Herstory: Women Who Changed the World. Viking, New York, NY, 304 pp. [of the women who “changed the world” unfortunately only 6 are scientists or doctors: Marie Curie, Margaret Mead, Antonia Novello, Valentina Tereshkova (first women in space), Mary Leakey, Rachel Carson. There is a 2-page biography for each, usually with a photograph.]
  • Ashford, J.I. 1990. The history of midwifery in the United States. Mothering 54: 64–71.
  • Ashwell, M. 2000. Elsie Widdowson (1906-2000). Nature 406(6798): 844 [obituary of Dr. Elsie Widdowson, an experimental British nutritionist who helped to shape war time rationing strategies].
  • Astin HS, Leland C. 1993. In the spirit of the times: Three generations of women leaders. In: Women in Higher Education: A Feminist Perspective, Glazer JS, Bensimon EM, Townsend BK, eds., Ginn Press, Needham Heights, MA, pp. 493–506.
  • Baer, E.D. 1990. Nurses. In: Women, Health and Medicine in America: A Historical Handbook (R.D. Apple, ed.), Garland Publishing, Inc., NY, pp. 459–475. [a history of nurses and nursing in the U.S.]
  • Bailey, M.J. 1994. American Women in Science: A Biographical Dictionary. ABC-CLIO, Inc., Denver, CO, 463 pp.
  • Bailey, M.J. 1998. American Women in Science: 1950 to the Present. A Biographical Dictionary. ABC- CLIO, Santa Barbara, CA, 455 pp.
  • Baker, G. 1973. Dr. Isabel Clifton Cookson. Geological Society of Australia Special Publication 4: iii-x. [biography of the Australian palynologist and paleobotanist]
  • Baker, R. 1944. The First Woman Doctor. Julian Messner, Inc., New York, NY, 246 pp.
  • Baker, S.J. 1992. Fighting for Life (excerpt). In: Written by Herself, Autobiographies of American Women: An Anthology, (J.K. Conway, ed.), Random House, NY, pp. 143–170. [Dr. S. Josephine Baker, 1873- 1945, received her medical degree from the New York Infirmary for Women and Children. She was a pioneer in public health, especially for children.]
  • Baldwin, R.S. 1981. The Fungus Fighters : Two Women Scientists and Their Discovery. Ocrnell University Press, Ithaca, NY, 212 pp. [on Elizabeth Lee Hazen, a microbiologist, and Rachel Fuller Brown, a chemist, the discoverers of Nystatin, one of the first anti-fungal drugs developed]
  • Baly, M.E. 1990. Florence Nightingale and the establishment of the first school at St. Thomas’s—Myth vs. Reality. In: Florence Nightingale and her Era: A Collection of New Scholarship (V. Bullough, B. Bullough and M.P. Stanton, eds.), Garland Publishing, Inc., New York, NY, pp. 3–22.
  • Bancroft, A., L. Arnesen, with C. Dahle. 2003. No Horizon is So Far: A Historic Journey across Antarctica. Da Capo Press, Cambridge, MA, 253 pp. [the story of two former schoolteachers, one from the US and one from Norway, who were the first women to cross the continent of Antarctica on foot.]
  • Barbour R. 1997. Lucy Hutchinson, atomism and the atheist dog. In: Women, Science and Medicine 1500-1700: Mothers and Sisters of the Royal Society (Hunter L, and Hutton S, eds.), Sutton Publishing, Phoenix Mill, UK, pp. 122–137.
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  • Zagorski N. 2005. Profile of Deborah P. Delmer. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA 102(44): 15736–15738. [profile of a newly elected member of the National Academy of Sciences who trained and did reearch in plant biochemistry, but recently moved to the Rockefeller Foundation to work on agricultural development in Africa]
  • Zagorski N. 2005. Profile of Janet M. Thornton. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA 102(35): 12296–12298. [profile of a newly elected member of the National Academy of Sciences who studies structural biology, especially the relationship of protein structure and function]
  • Zagorski N. 2006. Profile of Ewine F. van Dishoeck. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA 103(33): 12229–12231. [profile of a newly elected member of the National Academy of Sciences who is]
  • Zagorski, N. 2007. Profile of Monica G. Turner. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA 104(12): 4779–4781. [profile of a newly elected member of the National Academy of Sciences who is a landscape ecologist]
  • Zottoli, S.J., E.-A. Seyfarth. 1994. Julia B. Platt (1857-1935): Pioneer comparative embryologist and neuroscientist. Brain Behav. Evol. 43: 92–106.
  • Zukowski, H. 1998. Advocating for the red apes: Biruté Galdikas. Hemispheres Magazine (United Airlines), January: 18–24.
  • Zwinger, S. and A. Zwinger, eds. 1995. Women in wilderness: Writings and photographs. Harcourt Brace and Company, San Diego, 100 pp.

Book Reviews

  • Abir-Am, P.G. 1991. Nobelesse oblige: Lives of molecular biologists. Isis 82(2): 326–343. [Book review of 7 books on molecular biologists, including Rita Levi-Montalcini's autobiography, In Praise of Imperfection: My Life and Work, Basic Books, NY, 1988, 220 pp.]
  • Ainley MG. 1989. Book review: Women in Science: Options and Access. Vámos É ed., National Museum of Science and Technology (Budapest), 1987, 249 pp. Technology and Culture 30(4): 1085–1086.
  • Ainley, M.G. 1995. Book review: On the Edge of Discovery: Australian Women in Science edited by Farley Kelly, Text Publishing Company, Melbourne, Australia, 1993, 348 pp. Isis 86(2): 304–305.
  • Alic, J.A. 2002. Book review: Athena Unbound: The Advancement of Women in Science and Technology. Etzkowitz H, Kemelgor C and Uzzi B; Cambridge University Press, 2000. Technological Forecasting and Social Change 69(9): 953–954.
  • Allison P. 2000. Book review: Women in Science: Meeting Career Challenges. Pattatucci AM ed., Sage, 1998. In: Building Inclusive Science: Connecting Women’s Studies and Women in Science and Engineering (S.V. Rosser, ed.), Women's Studies Quarterly 28(1-2): 319–322.
  • Altmann J. 1987. Primatology in East Africa. Science 235(4789): 694–695. [Book review of The Chimpanzees of Gombé by Jane Goodall, Belknap Press, 1986, 674 pp.
  • Anderson K. 2003. Book review: Mary Somerville: Science, Illumination, and the Female Mind. Neeley KA, Cambridge University Press, 2001, 263 pp. British Journal for the History of Science 36(2): 237–238.
  • Ankeny, R.A. 2002. Bird watching with honest Jim. Science 295: 977–978. [review of: Genes, Girls and Gamow by James D. Watson, Oxford University Press/Knopf New York, 333 pp. 2001] "Honest" Jim Watson continues his autobiography, covering the years 1953–1968. He makes an attempt to "balance his treatment of [Rosalind] Franklin."
  • Annan, G. 1992. How to do it and avoid the consequences. Book review of: Marie Stopes and the Sexual Revolution by J. Rose, Faber Press, 272 pp. The Spectator 269: 41. [Marie Stopes was a paleobotanist and the first person to open a birth control clinic in Great Britain]
  • Anonymous. 1984. Book review: Double Dilemma: Minorities and Women in Science Education. Kahle JB, Purdue University Press, 1982, 163 pp. . Science, Technology, and Human Values 9(1): 135–136.
  • Anonymous. 1997. Role models for black women in science. Book review: Journeys of Women in Science and Engineering. Ambrose SA, Dunkle KL, Lazarus BB, Nair I, Harkus DA; Temple University Press, 461 pp. The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education 17: 136–137.
  • Anonymous. 2003. Book review of: Almost Heaven: The Story of Women in Space (by Bettyann Holtzmann Kevles, Basic Books (Perseus), NY, 2003, 288 pp.) Science 302: 1507. [not in KU library]
  • Anonymous. 2004. History of Women in Science Prize. Isis 95(2): 264–265. [announcement that the 2003 prize goes to Ellen S. More, for her book, Restoring the Balance: Women Physicians and the Profession of Medicine, 1850-1995; with summary of the book]
  • Arias, A.M. 2006. From cell to organism: How genetics unlocked the mysteries of development. Nature 441: 714–718. [Includes information on the work of Dr. Christiane Nusslein-Volhard, who won the Nobel Prize for her work on development.]
  • Arnault LS. 1989. Book reviews: 1) Hypatia's Heritage: A History of Women in Science from Antiquity through the Nineteenth Century. Alic M, Beacon Press, 1986. 2) Marie Curie: A Life. Giroud F, Holmes and Meier Publishers, 1986. 3) The Science Question in Feminism. Harding S, Cornell University Press, 1986. Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 14(2): 502–507.
  • Astell CR. 2000. Book review: Women's Science: Learning and Succeeding from the Margins by Margaret A. Eisenhart and Elizabeth Finkel, 1998. University Chicago Press, Chicago, IL. 272 pp. Science Education 84(6): 793–796.
  • Barondes, S.H. 1998. Change of mind. Book review of: Molecules of Emotion: Why you Feel the Way you Feel by Candace B. Pert. Nature 391: 349–350. [Review of Pert's book, which is described as a memoir of her life in science. Pert helped to develop the first practical binding assay for opiate receptors in the brain as a graduate student, later worked at the National Institutes of Health, and published more than 200 scientific papers. She made a formal and public protest when she was not included in the Lasker Award for work on opiate receptors, which was given to her graduate advisor and 2 other individuals. She later gave up science to work in holistic medicine.]
  • Baruch EH. 1993. Reply to "Book review: Women, Politics, and Change, etc. by Schiebinger 1993. Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences 29(3): 253.
  • Bateson, M.C. 2001. Righting the balance. American Scientist 89(1): 89–90. [book review of The Door in the Dream: Conversations with Eminent Women in Science by E. Wasserman, Joseph Henry Press, 2000] [This book consists of interviews with women who are members of the prestigious U.S. National Academy of Sciences.]
  • Benjamin M. 1988. Book review: Uneasy Careers and Intimate Lives: Women in Science, 1789-1979. Abir-Am P, Outram D, Rutgers University Press, 1987, 365 pp. Journal for the History of Astronomy 74: 439–441.
  • Berry T. 2000. Book review: The Biographical Dictionary of Women in Science: Pioneering Lives from Ancent Times to the Mid-20th Century by Marilyn Ogilvie and Joy Harvey, 2000. Routledge Press. 2 volumes, 1499 pp. Library Journal 125(14): 192.
  • Blackburn S. 2005. When the girls ruled philosophy. New Scientist 188(2527): 49. [Book review of The Owl of Minerva: A Memoir by Midgley M, Routledge on women in philosophy at Oxford University]
  • Blakely K, Langman L. 2005. Book review: The Time Divide: Work, Family and Gender Inequality. Jacobs JA, Gerson K; Harvard University Press, 2004, 259 pp. Contemporary Sociology 34(4): 372–373.
  • Blow, D. 2002. Encounters with a dark lady. An insight into one of the scientists who determined the structure of DNA. Nature 418: 725-726 [book review of Rosalind Franklin: The Dark Lady of DNA by Brenda Maddox, HarperCollins, 380 pp., 2002]
  • Blum LM. 2005. Which woman? Which bodies?. Contemporary Sociology 34(4): 345–348. [book review of Am I Still a Woman?: Hysterectomy and Gender Identity by Jean Elson, Temple University Press, 2004, 254 pp.]
  • Boulter CJ. 1995. Book review: Women and science: the Snark Syndrome. Byrne EM, Falmer Press, 1993, 208 pp. . International Journal of Science Education 17(1): 135–136.
  • Bourguignon, E. 2001. Book reviews of: How Like a Leaf: An Interview with Donna J. Haraway by T.N. Goodeve, Routledge Press, NY, 1999; Margaret Mead and Ruth Benedict: The Kinship of Women by H. Lapsley, Unveristy of Massachusetts Press, Amherst, MA, 1999; Grit-Tempered: Early Women Archaeologists in the Southeastern United States, ed. by N.M. White, L.P. Sullivan, and R.A. Marrinan, University Press of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 1999. NWSA Journal 13(2): 202–206.
  • Breedlove, M. 1999. Bending gender. New Scientist 163(2203): 52-53 [book review of Sexing the Brain by Lesley Rogers, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1999 and Sex and Cognition by Doreen Kimura, MIT Press, 1999, two books that take opposite viewpoints on the question of nature vs. nurture in determining gender roles.]
  • Brickhouse, N.W., W.J. Letts, and S.K. Tan. 1998. Book review: Women and Science: The Snark Syndrome. Byrne E, Falmer Press, 1993, 208 pp.. Science Education 82(2): 285–286. [a report on a 5- year policy study of women in higher education institutions in Australia]
  • Brickhouse NW, Lottero-Perdue PS. 2003. Book reviews: 1. The Advancement of Women in Science and Technology. Etzkowitz H, Kemelgor C, Uzzi B, Cambridge University Press, 2000. 2. Women, Science, and Society: The Crucial Union. Rosser SV, Teacher's College Press, 2000. 3. Women Becoming Mathematicians: Creating a Professional Identity in Post-World War II America. Murray MAM, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 2000. Signs 28(3): 987–991.
  • Brough M. 1998. Book review: Cultivating women, cultivating science. Flora's daughters and botany in England 1760-1860, by Anne Shteir, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, 1986, 301 pp. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 20(1): 102–103.
  • Brown JW. 2000. Book review: Women's Science: Learning and Succeeding from the Margins by Margaret A. Eisenhart and Elizabeth Finkel, 1998. University of Chicago Press, Chicago IL. 272 pp. Isis 91(2): 412–413.
  • Browne J. 1986. Female attention. Nature 362(6112): 452. [Book review of Women in Science: Antiquity through the Nineteenth Century. Ogilvie MB, MIT Press, 1986, 254 pp.
  • Women Scientists from Antiquity to the Present: An Index. Herzenberg CL, Locust Hill Press, 1986, 200 pp. ]
  • Burlingame, L.J. 1978. The history of women in medicine. Maryland Historian 9(2): 51–62. [Book review of Doctors Wanted: No Women Need Apply— Sexual Barriers in the Medical Profession, 1835-1975 by Mary Roth Walsh, and Midwives and Medical Men: A History of Inter-Professional Rivalries and Women’s Rights by Jean Donnison.]
  • Burlingame, L.J. 1993. Book review: The Scientific Lady: A Social History of Women's Scientific Interests 1520-1918 by Patricia Phillips, St. Martin's Press, New York, 1990, 279 pp. Isis 84(2): 354–355.
  • Byers, N. 2006. Out of the Shadows: Contributions of Twentieth-Century Women to Physics. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 498 pp.
  • Carter JB. 2001. Book review: Margaret Mead Made Me Gay: Personal Essays, Public Ideas by E. Newton, Duke University Press, 2000, 360 pp. Journal of the History of Sexuality 103(4): 564–566.
  • Caton H. 2000. Book review: Coming of Age in American Anthropology: Margaret Mead and Paradise. by M. Isaia, Unviersal Publishers, 1999, 299 pp. Politics and the Life Sciences 19(1): 114–115.
  • Caton H. 1999. Book review: Not Even Wrong: Margaret Mead, Derek Freeman, and the Samoans. by M. Orans, Chandler and Sharp, 1996, 190 pp.; and The Fateful Hoaxing of Margaret Mead: A Historical Analysis of Her Samoan Research by D. Freeman, Westview Press, 1998, 320 pp. Politics and the Life Sciences 18(1): 151–154.
  • Cecil, J. 1997. Book review of: Married Love (by M. Stopes, Gollancz, 1995, 141 pp.). Journal of Biosocial Science 29: 119–120. [Marie Stopes was a paleobotanist and the first person to open a birth control clinic in Great Britain]
  • Chambers NG. 1988. Book reviews: Feminist Approaches to Science. Bleier R ed., Pergamon Press, 1986. Teaching Science and Health from a Feminist Perspective: A Practical Guide. Rosser SV, Pergamon Press, 1986. Women, Feminism, and Biology. Birke L, Methuen, 1986. Women, Biology, and Public Policy. Sapiro V ed., Sage Publications, 1985. Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 13(2): 340–343.
  • Chaplin, M.H. 1992. Book review of: Women in Engineering: Gender, Power, and Workplace Culture by J.S. McIlwee and J.G. Robinson, SUNY Press, 248 p., 1992. Choice 30(2): 333.
  • Chaplin, M.H. 1993. Book review of: Breaking the Barriers: Helping Female and Minority Students Succeed in Mathematics and Science by B.C. Clewell, B.T. Anderson, and M.E. Thorpe, Jossey-Bass, 1993, 333 p., 1993. Choice 30(10): 1645.
  • Chaplin, M.H. 1994. Book review of: Women and Science: The Snark Syndrome, by Eileen M. Byrne, Falmer, 208 p., 1993. Choice 32(1): 136. [a report on a 5-year policy study of women in higher education institutions in Australia]
  • Chaplin, M.H. 1995. Book review of: American Women Afield: Writings by Pioneering Women Naturalists, ed. by Marcia Myers Bonta, Texas A&M University Press, College Station, TX, 248 p., 1995. Choice 32(11-12): 1747.
  • Chauhan, R. 2002. Book reviews: The Female Circumcision Controversy: An Anthropological Perspective by Ellen Gruenbaum, University of Pennsylvania Press, Philaldelphia, PA, 2000; and Female Genital Multilation: A Guide to Laws and Policies Worldwide, ed. by A. Rahman and N. Toubia, Zed Books, NY, 2000. NWSA Journal 14(2): 230–233.
  • Cheney, D.L. 1982. Females as strategists. Science 215: 1090–1091. [Book review of The Woman that Never Evolved by Sarah Blaffer Hrdy, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA, 1981, 256 pp.]
  • Chipman, E. 1986. Women on the Ice. Melbourne University Press, Carlton, Victoria, Australia, 224 pp. [history of women's role in exploration and research in Antarctica]
  • Clack J. 2005. Digging for clues. Nature 438: 163, 165 [Book review of Discovering Dorothea: The Life of the Pioneering Fossil-Hunter Dorothea Bate by K. Shindler, HarperCollins, 304 pp. [Dorothea Bate was a paleontologist who worked in the first half of the twentieth century, especially on Pleistocene faunas.]
  • Clark JV. 1983. Book review: Double Dilemma: Minorities and Women in Science Education. Kahle JB, Purdue University Press, 1982, 163 pp. . The Journal of Negro Education 52(1): 85–87.
  • Colinvaux, P. 1981. Women’s work: The Woman That Never Evolved by Sarah Blaffer Hrdy. New York Times, November 15, 1981.
  • Conway J. 1988. Marginalized positions. Science 242(4877): 448. [book review of Uneasy Careers and Intimate Lives: Women in Science, 1789-1979; Abir-Am PG and Outram D eds., Rutgers University Press, 1987, 365 pp.]
  • Concar, D. 1999. Inhuman futures. New Scientist 164(2216): 44-47 [Information on her life and book review of Mother Nature: A History of Mothers, Infants, and Natural Selection by Sarah Blaffer Hrdy, 1999, Pantheon].
  • Coyaud, S. 2001. What every woman knows. Nature 410(6830): 747–748. [Book review of: Athena Unbound: The Advancement of Women in Science and Technology by H. Etzkowitz, C. Kemelgor and B. Uzzi, Cambridge University Press, 2000; and The Gender and Science Reader edited by M. Lederman and Ingrid Bartsch, Routledge, 2001]
  • Coyne, J.A., and A. Berry. 2000. Rape as an adaptation. Nature 404: 121-122 [review of A Natural History of Rape: Biological Bases of Sexual Coercion by R. Thornhill and C.T. Palmer, MIT Press, 2000]
  • Creager, A.N.H. 2002. Contraception—from contraband to Rx. American Scientist 90: 88-90 [book review of: Devices and Desires: A History of Contraceptives in America by Andrea Tone, 366 p., 2001; and Sexual Chemistry: A History of the Contraceptive Pill by Lara V. Marks, 372 p., 2001].
  • Creager, A.N.H. 2003. Crystallizing a life in science. American Scientist 91: 64-66 [review of Rosalind Franklin: The Dark Lady of DNA by Brenda Maddox, HarperCollins, 2002, 380 pp.].
  • Cronin, M.F. Sea Legs: Tales of a Woman Oceanographer by Kathleen Crane, Westview Press, 2003. Geotimes 48(8); 35.
  • Daum, A.W. 1999. Book review of: Natural Eloquence: Women Reinscribe Science by A.B. Shteir and B.T. Gates, eds., University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, 1997, 280 pp. [a collection of 12 essays on female popularizers of science, beginning in the middle of the 19th century and continuing to the present day]
  • Davenport-Hines, R. 1992. Sex and the singular woman. Nature 360(6402): 381. [Book review of Marie Stopes and the Sexual Revolution, by June Rose, Faber and Faber, 1992, 272 pp.] [Dr. Stopes was a paleobotanist, pioneering researcher in the structure of coal, and the first to open a birth control clinic in Great Britain.]
  • Davenport-Hines, R. 1998. Liberator or 'fix'? Nature 396(6706): 38 [Review of: On the Pill: A Social History of Oral Contraceptives 1950-1970 by Elizabeth Siegel Watkins, John Hopkins University Press, 1998, 202 pp.]
  • Davis AB. 1989. Book review: Uneasy Careers and Intimate Lives: Women in Science, 1789-1979. Abir- Am PG and Outram D eds., Rutgers University Press, 1987, 365 pp. Technology and Culture 30(4): 1084–1085.
  • Davis, R.E. Book reviews: The Abortion Myth by L. Cannold, Wesleyan University Press, London, CT, 2000; and The Politics of Fertility Control by D.R. McFarlane and K.J. Meier, Chatham House, NY, 2001. NWSA Journal 14(3): 212–215.
  • Delamont S. 2002. Hypatia's revenge? Feminist perspectives in S&TS. Social Studies of Science 32(1): 167–174. [Book reviews: 1) The Gender and Science Reader (Muriel Lederman and Ingrid Bartsch, eds), Routledge, 2001, 505 pp. 2) Feminist Science Studies: A New Generation by (Maralee Mayberry, Banu Subramaniam, and Lisa H. Wesel, eds), Routledge, 2001, 354 pp. 3) Women, Science and Technology: A Reader in Feminist Science Studies (Mary Wyer, Donna Cookmeyer, Mary Barbercheck, Hatice Oztruk and Marta Wayne, eds), Routledge, 2001, 376 pp. S&TS = science and technology studies]
  • Dorit, R. 2004. Rethinking Sex. American Scientist 92: 464–467. [Book review of Evolution's Rainbow: Diversity, Gender, and Sexuality in Nature and People by Joan Roughgarden, University of California Press, 2004, 474 pp.]
  • Douglass, J.A. 2005. Different class: The 'big three' universities in the United States are upholding a long tradition of élitism. Nature 438: 561–562. [Book review of The Chosen: The Hidden History of Admissions and Exclusion at Harvard, Yale, and Princeton by J. Karabel, Houghton Mifflin, 2005, 672 pp.
  • Drayton R. 1997. Book review: Cultivating Women, Cultivating Science: Flora's Daughters and Botany in England 1760 to 1860. Shteir AB, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996, 301 pp. Isis 88(3): 546–547.
  • Duffield, A. 1998. Marie Stopes, Eugenics and the English Birth Control Movement, ed. by Robert A. Peel, The Galton Institute, 1997, 110 pp. Journal of Biosocial Science 30(1): 139-140 [Marie Stopes was a paleobotanist and the first person to open a birth control clinic in Great Britain]
  • Eakin, E. 2002. Show me your plumage. The New York Times Book Review, Sunday, July 14, 2002, p. 26 [review of: Sexual Selections: What We Can and Can't Learn about Sex from Animals by Marlene Zuk, University of California Press, Berkeley, CA, 2002, 239 pp.] ["A biologist argues that female animals call the evolutionary shots."]
  • Ebert-May, D. 2005. Book review: The Science Glass Ceiling: Academic Women Scientists and the Struggle to Succeed. Rosser SV, Routledge, 2004, 165 pp. Science Education 89(2): 348–350.
  • Emin-Tunc, T. 2004. Book review: Into Our Own Hands: The Women’s Health Movement in the United States,1969-1990 by Sandra Morgen, Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ, 2002. NWSA Journal 16(2): 237–239.
  • Epstein JL. 1984. Book review: Women in Science: Portraits from a World in Transition. Gornick V, Simon and Schuster, 1983, 165 pp. Isis 75(3): 578–579.
  • Etzkowitz, H. 1995. Women's experience in science: Why so bad? Chemical and Engineering News 73(35): 67–68. [Review of Gender Differences in Science Careers: The Project Access Study by Gerhard Sonnert with Gerald Holton, Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ, 1995, 187 p.]
  • Fagerstrom DM. 2002. Book review: 1) International Encyclopedia of Women Scientists. Oakes EH, Facts on File, 2001, 448 pp.; 2) International Women in Science: A Biographical Dictionary to 1950. Haines CMC and Stevens HM, ABC-CLIO, 2001, 383 pp. Reference and User Services Quarterly 41(4): 392–393.
  • Fara, P. 2004. In from the cold. Nature 432: 553 [Book review of Mary Somerville and the World of Science by A. Chapman, Canopus, 2004, 176 pp. and Collected Works of Mary Somerville by J.A. Secord, Theoemmes Continuum, 2004, 9 vols.]
  • Fausto-Sterling, A. 2002. Gender and science in the DNA story. [book review of: Rosalind Franklin: Dark Lady of DNA by Brenda Maddox, HarperCollins, London, 400 pp.]
  • Feldberg G. 1991. Book Review: Despite the Odds: Essays on Canadian Women and Science. Ainley MG, Véhicule Press, 1990, 452 pp. . Canadian Historical Review 77(6): 58–60.
  • Ferguson, R.B. 1999. Bulletins from the barricades. Natural History 108(9): 64–65. [Review of: Divided Labours: An Evolutionary View of Women at Work by K. Browne, Yale University Press].
  • Fernie, J.D. 2004. Stargazing siblings. American Scientist 92: 186–188. [Review of: The Herschel Partnership: As Viewed by Caroline by Michael Hoskin, Science History Publications, 2003, 182 pp.; and Caroline Herschel's Autobiographies, ed. by Michael Hoskin, Science History Publications, 2003, 147 pp.] [Caroline Herschel (1750-1848) discovered 8 comets and indexed and corrected Flamstead's star catalogue]
  • Fissell, M. 2001. Book Review: The Midwives Book or the Whole Art of Midwifery Discovered by J. Sharp, ed. by E. Hobby. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 1999. NWSA Journal 13(1): 199–200.
  • Foster, S.A. 2000. Book review: The Woman that Never Evolved by Sarah Blaffer Hrdy, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA, 266 p., 1999. Quarterly Review of Biology 75(3): 353.
  • Fox, M.F. 1986. Mind, nature, and masculinity. Contemporary Sociology 15(2): 197-199 [review of Reflections on Gender and Science by Evelyn Fox Keller, Yale University Press, 1985, 193 pp.]
  • Fox MF. 2005. Book review: Women in Science: Career Process and Outcomes. Xie, Yu, Shauman KA; Harvard University Press, 2003, 318 pp. Contemporary Sociology 34(4): 361–362.
  • Gerard SE. 1990. Book review: Uneasy Careers and Intimate Lives: Women in Science, 1789-1979. Abir-Am PG and Outram D eds., Rutgers University Press, 1987, 365 pp. Contemporary Sociology 19(4): 560–562.
  • Gerstel N. 2005. In search of time. Science 308: 204–205. [Book reviews of The Time Divide: Work, Family, and Gender Inequality by Jacobs JA and Gerson K, Harvard University Press, 2004, 259 pp.; and Working in a 24/7 Economy: Challenges for American Families by Presser HB, Russell Sage Foundation, 2003, 281 pp.]
  • Giangrego E. 1988. AAWD: A voice for women in dentistry. Journal of the American Dental Association (JADA) 117: 441–445. [AAWD = American Association of Women in Dentistry]
  • Glausiusz, J. 2002. The forgotten woman of DNA: Who really discovered the double helix? Discover 23(12): 86 [book review of Rosalind Franklin: The Dark Lady of DNA by Brenda Maddox, HarperCollins, 2002].
  • Glausiusz J. 2006. Super women: They smash atoms, save endangered apes, and protect the planet. Discover 23(6 or 12?): 68–69. [book review of a series of books for young adults called Women’s Adventures in Science, Joseph Henry Press]
  • Goodfield, J. 1995. Indecent exposures. Nature 374: 831–832. [Review of Marie Curie: A Life by Susan Quinn, Simon and Schuster, 1995, 509 pp.]
  • Goodfield, J. 1996. Invisible strangers. Nature 380(6572): 306–307. [Review of Women Scientists in America: Before Affirmative Action 1940-1972 by Margaret W. Rossiter, Johns Hopkins University Press,1995, 584 pp.]
  • Gopinathan, A. 2005. Spotlight on invisible women. Book review of: Pandora's Breeches: Women, Science and Power in the Enlightenment by P. Fara, Pimlico, 2004, 288 pp. Science 307: 522.
  • Gould P. 2003. Book review: International Women in Science: A Biographical Dictionary to 1950. Haines CMC, Stevens HM, ABC-CLIO, 2001, 383 pp. British Journal of the History of Science 36(2): 231–233.
  • Grinstein LS. 2002. Book review: The Biographical Dictionary of Women in Science: Pioneering Lives from Ancient Times to the Mid-Twentieth Century. Ogilvie M, Harvey J eds., Routledge, 2000, 1499 pp. Isis 93(1): 170.
  • Gupta, S. 2000. When silence is not a true option [Review of: The Woman Who Knew Too Much: Alice Stewart and the Secrets of Radiation by Gayle Greene, University of Michigan Press, 2000] [Stewart was largely responsible, in the early 1950's, for linking x-ray exposure with cancer]
  • Hall, K. 1999. Snails and tails or sugar and spice. [Review of: The Two Sexes: Growing Up Apart, Coming Together by E.E. Maccoby, Harvard University Press, 1998, 384 pp.] Science 285: 1681–1682.
  • Hall, R. 1998. Book review of: The Evolving Female: A Life-History Perspective by M.E. Morbeck, A. Galloway and A. Zihlman, 332 pp., Princeton University Press, 1997. American Journal of Human Biology 10: 97–98. [The book is on the evolution of the human female, especially the female body, based on studies of primates, especially those groups in which behavior has been carefully observed, e.g., the Gombé chimpanzees. It also includes 3 chapters (Part IV) on postmenopausal osteoporosis and adipose tissue.]
  • Haseltine, F.P. 1999. Does sex matter? Review of: Has Feminism Changed Science? by Londa Schiebinger, 264 pp., Harvard University Press, 1999. Science 285(5427): 538. [see also response from Schiebinger in Science, below]
  • Harvey J. 1998. Book review: Cultivating Women, Cultivating Science: Flora's Daughters and Botany in England 1760 to 1860. Shteir AB, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996, 301 pp. British Journal for the History of Science 31(1): 87–89.
  • Hawkes, K. 1999. Evolutionary play on maternal behaviour. Nature 402(6758): 120–121. Review of: Mother Nature: A History of Mothers, Infants and Natural Selection by Sarah Blaffer Hrdy, Pantheon/Chatto & Windus, 1999, 725/448 pp. (hardback/paperback).
  • Henson, P.M. 2000. Review of: Kindred Nature: Victorian and Edwardian Women Embrace the Living World, University of Chicago Press, 1998, 294 pp. Journal of the History of Biology 33(2): 394–397.
  • Herbert, R. 2005. Book Review of: Obsessive Genius (by Barbara Goldsmith, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2004). New Scientist 185: 55. [a biography of Marie Curie]
  • Howard, J.A.K. 1998. The riches found in a prospector's pan. Nature 396(6711): 533–534. [book review of Dorothy Hodgkin: A Life by Georgina Ferry, Granta, 1998, 419 pp.]
  • Hrdy, Sarah Blaffer. 1999. Review of her book: Mother Nature: A History of Mothers, Infants, and Natural Selection (Pantheon, 1999, 752 pp.). Kirkus Reviews, October 1, 1999, 1 p. [found on Lexis-Nexis Academic Universe]
  • Hrdy, S.B. 2004. Sexual diversity and the gender agenda. Nature 429: 19–21. [Book review of Evolution's Rainbow: Diversity, Gender and Sexuality in Nature and People by Joan Roughgarden, University of California Press, 2004, 472 pp.]
  • Hubbard R. 1990. Book reviews: 1) Uneasy Careers and Intimate Lives-Women in Science, 1789-1979. Abir-Am PG and Outram D, Rutgers University Press, 1987, 365 pp. 2) Women Doctors in Gilded-Age Washington: Race, Gender and Professionalization. Moldow G, University of Illinois Press, 1987, 246 pp. Science and Society 54(2): 231–233.
  • Hudson G. 1992. Book review: Women in Science: Antiquity through the Nineteenth Century. A Biographical Dictionary with Annotated Bibliography. Ogilvie MB, The MIT Press, 1988, xiii + 254 pp. . British Journal for the History of Science 25(85): 292–294.
  • Hufnagel, G.L. 2000. Book reviews: 1) Ms. Mentor's Impeccable Advice for Women in Academia by Emily Toth, University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997, 222 pp. 2) Shattering the Myths: Women in Academe by Judith Glazer-Raymo, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999, 237 pp. 3) Gender on Campus: Issues for College Women by Sharon Bohn Gmelch, Rutgers University Press, 1998, 309 pp.
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  • Schmid R. 2001. Book review: Ladies in the Laboratory? American and British Women in Science, 1800- 1900: A Survey of their Contributions to Research. Creese MRS, The Scarecrow Press, 1998, 452 pp. Taxon 50(4): 1291–1292.
  • Schmid R. 1999. Book review: Women in the Biological Sciences: A Biobibliographic Sourcebook. Grinstein LS, Biermann CA, and Rose RK eds.; Greenwood Press, 1997, 609 pp. Taxon 48(4): 861.
  • Schmid R. 1999. Book review: Women and the ‘Dictionary of National Biography’: A Guide to DNB Volumes 1885-1985 and Missing Persons. Fenwick G, Scolar Press, 1994, 181 pp. The Dictionary of National Biography: Missing Persons. Nicholls CS ed., Oxford University Press, 1993, 768 pp. Taxon 48(4): 860.
  • Schmid, R. 1992. Book review: Stuckey, Ronald L. Women Botanists of Ohio Born before 1900, with reference calendars from 1776 to 2028, RLS Creations, Columbus, OH, 1992, 67 pp. Taxon 41: 629.
  • Schmid, R. 1999. Bamboozled by botany, Beatrix bypasses bigoted biology, begins babying bountiful bunnies: OR Beatrix Potter [1866–1943] as a mycologist: The period before Peter Rabbit amd friends. Taxon 48: 438-443 [a book review of six books, four of them about Beatrix Potter and her life, and two which include her drawings and paintings of fungi, lichens and plants. Before she wrote the Peter Rabbit books, Potter made some contributions to mycology and botany, but was rejected by the scientific establishment in Victorian England.]
  • Schmid, R. 2000. McWilliams Tullberg, Rita. Women at Cambridge. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1998. Taxon 49: 844. [a book review of the history of admitting and graduating women from Cambridge University. The first woman graduated in 1948; Cambridge was the last university in England to graduate women.]
  • Schmid, R. 2000. Sampson, Mary & Edwards, Sheila. Women, Science, and The Royal Society: An exhibition to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the election of the first women to Fellowship of The Royal Society. Taxon 49: 845 [a review of an exhibition booklet from an exhibit at the Royal Society, London held 19 April 1995-22 September 1995].
  • Schmid, R. 2000. A curious Indian reissue of Agnes Arber's (1879-1960) classic work on herbals. Taxon 49: 851–853. [Agnes Arber was a botanist, known for her theories on plant morphology.]
  • Schmid, R., and B. Butler. 2000. Stanwell-Fletcher, Theodora C. (Cope). Driftwood Valley: A Woman Naturalist in the Northern Wilderness. Taxon 49: 343–344. [Stanwell-Fletcher was an ornithologist; this book includes her diaries from collecting in the Driftwood Valley wilderness, British Columbia, Canada]
  • Schneider DM. 1983. The coming of a sage to Samoa. Natural History 92(6): 4,6,10. [Book review of Margaret Mead and Samoa: The Making and Unmaking of an Anthropological Myth by Freeman D, Harvard University Press, 379 pp.]
  • Schneider, W.H. 1998. Book review of: "Almost a Man of Genius": Clémence Royer, Feminism, and Nineteenth-Century Science by Joy Harvey, Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ, xviii + 278 pp., 1997. Isis 89: 346–347.
  • Searing SE. 1997. Book reviews: 1) Women and Science: An Annotated Bibliography. Ogilvie MB with Meek KL, Garland Publishing, 1996, 556 pp. 2) Notable Women in the Life Sciences: A Biographical Dictionary. Shearer BF and Shearer BS eds., Greenwood Press, 1996, 440 pp. Isis 88(2): 382–383.
  • Shapiro CG. 1991. Book review: Uneasy Careers and Intimate Lives: Women in Science, 1789-1979. Abir-Am PG and Outram D eds., Rutgers University Press, 1987, 363 pp. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 13(2): 327–328.
  • Shapiro, J. 1999. Shifting the spotlight from center stage. Science 283: 1464. [Review of: Women's Science: Learning and Succeeding from the Margins by M.A. Eisenhart and E. Finkel, University of Chicago Press, 1998]
  • Sime, R.L. 1995. A heroine in her times. Science 267: 1842–1843. [Review of Marie Curie: A Life by Susan Quinn, Simon and Schuster, 1995, 509 pp.]
  • Sime, R.L. 1996. Creative couples in the sciences. Science 273(5273): 316. [Review of Lives of Women in Science edited by H.M. Pycior, N.G. Slack and P.G. Abir`-Am, Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ, 369 pp.]
  • Skinner HCW. 1991. Book review: Women of Science: Righting the Record. Kass-Simon G and Farnes P eds.; Indiana University Press, 1990, 398 pp. American Journal of Science 291(9): 914–916.
  • Slack NG. 1991. Book Review: Women of Science-Righting the Record. Kassimon G, Farnes P, Indiana University Press, 1990, 386 pp. . Academe-Bulletin of the AAUP 77(6): 58–60.
  • Smocovitis, V.B. 2000. Review of: Life in the Treetops: Adventures of a Woman in Field Biology by Margaret D. Lowman, Yale University Press, 1999, 214 pp., Journal of the History of Biology 33(2): 392–394.
  • Smith, O. 2003. Spellbound. Science 302: 1508. [Review of the exhibit: Changing the Face of Medicine: Celebrating America's Women Physicians, curated by H.S. More and M. Parry, at the National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD, www.nlm.nih.gov/changingthefaceofmedicine]
  • Stamm, B.H. 2002. Book reviews: Women, Science and Society: The Crucial Union by S.V. Rosser, Teachers College Press, NY, 2001; and Women Becoming Mathematicians: Creating a Professional Identity in Post-World War II America by M.A.M. Murray, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 2000. NWSA Journal 14(2): 195–199.
  • Stanford, C.B. 2000. Darwinians look at rape, sex and war. American Scientist 88(4): 360-361 [Review of A Natural History of Rape: Biological Bases of Sexual Coercion by R. Thornhill and C.T. Palmer, The MIT Press, 1999; and Why Sex Matters: A Darwinian Look at Human Behavior by B.S. Low, Princeton University Press, 1999]
  • Stewart, A.J., and D. LaVaque-Manty. 2004. The parenting gap. Nature 427: 198–199. [Book review of: Women in Science: Career Processes and Outcomes by Y. Xie and Kimberlee A. Shauman, Harvard University Press, 2003, 336 pp.]
  • Sullivan G. 2004. Book review: Margaret Mead: A Biography by M. Bowman-Kruhm, Greenwood Press, 2003, 160 pp. Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences 40(3): 327–328.
  • Sullivan, K.D. 2004. Ad astra per aspera. American Scientist 92: 74–76. [book review of: Promised the Moon: The Untold Story of the First Women in the Space Station by Stephanie Nolen, Penguin Books, 2002; The Mercury 13: The Untold Story of Thirteen American Women and the Dream of Space Flight by Martha Ackmann, Random House, 2003; Almost Heaven: The Story of Women in Space by Bettyann Kevies, Basic Books, 2003]
  • Tang J. 1999. Book review: Women's Scence: Learning and Succeeding from the Margins by M.A. Eisenhart and E. Finkel, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL, 1998, 280 pp. Contemporary Sociology 28(5): 563–565.
  • Taylor M. 2002. Book review: The Fateful Hoaxing of Margaret Mead: A Historical Analysis of Her Samoan Research by Derek Freeman, Westview Press, 1999, 279 pp. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute 8(1): 161–162.
  • Thach, R.E. 1999. The effects of affirmative action. Science 284: 1473-1474 [Review of: The Shape of the River: Long-Term Consequences of Considering Race in College and University Admissions by W.G. Bowen and D. Bok, Princeton University Press, 1998].
  • Theodoratus, R.J. 1997. Book review of Not even wrong: Margaret Mead, Derek Freeman, and the Samoans by Martine Orans, Chandler` & Sharp Publishers, 1996. The Social Science Journal 34(1): 101–103.
  • Theriot, N.M. 2003. Gender and medicine in nineteenth-century America. NWSA Journal 15(2): 144–153. [book reviews of Hearts of Wisdom: American Women Caring for Kin, 1850-1940 by Emily K. Abel, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA, 2000; Nymphomania: A History by Carol Groneman, W.W. Norton, NY, 2000; Out of the Dead House: Nineteenth-Century Women Physicians and the Writing of Medicine by Susan Wells, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, WI, 2001; and Bodily and Narrative Forms: The Influence of Medicine on American Literature, 1845-1915 by Cynthia J. Davis, Stanford University Press, Stanford, CA, 2000.
  • Thompson MD. 1999. Book review: Stepping Stones. Fowler-Billings K, The Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1996, 222 pp. American Journal of Science 299(2): 171. [Fowler-Billings was a pioneering female geologist]
  • Trainor, T.A. 2001. The calculus of passion. American Scientist 89: 375–377. [Book review of The Bride of Science: Romance, Reason, and Byron's Daughter by B. Wooley, McGraw-Hill] [Ada Byron, daughter of the poet, Lord Byron, was involved in the development of the first calculating machine in the 1840's. The Ada programming language is named after her.]
  • Trencher SR. 2001. Book review: Margaret Mead and Ruth Benedict: The Kinship of Women. Lapsley H, University of Massachusetts Press, 1999, 416 pp. Ethnic and Racial Studies 24(6): 1092–1094.
  • Tutin W. 1995. The invisible company. Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London 49(1): 175–176. [book review of Women of Science: Righting the Record; Kass-Simon G and Farnes P eds., Indiana University Press, 1993, 398 pp.]
  • Vander Veer, J.B. 1998. Doctors, Nurses, and Medical Practitioners: A Biobibliographical Sourcebook, ed. by L.N. Magner (Greenwood Press, Westport, CT, 372 pp., 1997). Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) 279(10): 803–804.
  • van der Waals, JH. 2001. The fate of women in the science pipeline . Minerva 39(3): 353–357. [Book review: Athena Unbound: The Advancement of Women in Science and Technology by Henry Etzkowitz, Carol Kemelgor and Brian Uzzi, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2000, 282 pp.]
  • Vega, F.E. 2008. Book review: Amazing Rare Things: The Art of Natural History in the Age of Discovery, by David Attenborough, Susan Owens, Martin Clayton, and Rea Alexandratos. Yale University Press, New Haven, CT, 223 pp., 88 plates, 2007. The Quarterly Review of Biology 83: 198–200. [The last few chapters include information on Maria Sibylla Merian (see above for information on her)].
  • Verbrugge, M.H. 1992. Book review of: The Eternally Wounded Woman: Women, Doctors, and Exercise in the Late Nineteenth Century by Patricia Vertinsky, Manchester University Press, viii + 279 pp., 1990. Isis 83: 341–342.
  • Vogt A. 1999. Book review: Bedrohlich Gescheit. Ein Jahrhudert Frauen und Wissenschaft in Bayern (Dangerously Clever: A Century of Women and Science in Bavaria). Häntzschel H and Bussmann H, C. H. Beck Verlag, 1997, 356 pp. (in German). Zeitschrift für Geschichtswissenschaft 47(2): 173–174.
  • Ward J. 2001. Book review: Margaret Mead Made Me Gay: Personal Essays, Public Ideas by E. Newton, Duke University Press, 2000, 328 pp. Gender and Society 15(6): 936–938.
  • Watkins SA. 2000. Book review: Nobel Prize Women in Science: Their Lives, Struggles, and Momentous Discoveries, 1998. Carol Publishing Group, Seacaucus, NJ. 451 pp. Isis 91(2): 390–391.
  • Wennerås, C. and A. Wold. 1999. Taking a gender tiger by the tail. Nature 399(6738): 747–748. [Review of: Why So Slow? The Advancement of Women by Virginia Valian, MIT Press, 1999].
  • Wessler, S.R. 2001. McClintock at 100—reason to celebrate. Science 294: 62–63. [book review of: The Tangled Field: Barbara McClintock's Search for the Patterns of Genetic Control by Nathaniel C. Comfort, 357 p., 2001]
  • White, F.J. 1992. Walking with the Great Apes. Jane Goodall, Dian Fossey, Biruté Galdikas by Sy Montgomery (Houghton Mifflin, Boston, MA, 1991, 280 pp.). International Journal of Primatology 13(1): 107–109.
  • Whitelegg E. 2003. Book review: International Women in Science: A Biographical Dictionary to 1950. Haines CMC, Stevens HM, ABC-CLIO, 2001, 383 pp. Women's History Review 12(4): 708–709.
  • Yans V. 2004. Book review: The Fateful Hoaxing of Margaret Mead: A Historical Analysis of Her Samoan Research by Derek Freeman, Westview, 1999, 270 pp. Isis 95(1): 140–141.
  • Zagorski N. 2005. Profile of Deborah P. Delmer. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA 102(44): 15736–15738.
  • Zirkle, C. 1947. American Botany, 1873-1892; Decades of Transition, by Andrew Denny Rodgers, III, 340 pp., 1944 [book review]. Isis 37: 89–90.
  • Zuk, M. 1992. Book review: Women in the Field: America's Pioneering Women Naturalists by M.M. Bonta, Texas A&M University Press, College Station, TX, 299 pp., 1991. BioScience 42(3): 213–215.
  • Zuk, M. 1997. Environmental pioneer. Book review of: Rachel Carson, Witness for Nature by Linda Lear (Holt, NY, 1997). Science 278: 1897.
  • Zuk, M. and S.N. Gershman. 2000. A lab of one's own. [Book review of: Has Feminism Changed Science? by Londa Schiebinger, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA, 1999, 252 pp.] BioScience 50(7): 621–622.
  • Zuckerman, L. 1991. Apes 'R' not us. New York Review of Books 38(10): 43–49. [book review of: 1) Through a WIndow: My Thirty Years with Chimpanzees of Gombe, by Jane Goodall, Houghton Mifflin, 286 pp.; 2) Almost Human: A Journey into the World of Baboons, Strum SC, Random House 294 pp.; 3) How Monkeys See the World: Inside the Mind of Another Species, Cheney DL and Seyfarth RM, University of Chicago Press, 377 pp.; 4) Language and Species, Bickerton D, University of Chicago Press, 297 pp.; 5) Uniquely Human: The Evolution of Speech, Thought, and Selfless Behavior, Lieberman P, Harvard University Press, 210 pp.

Bibliographies on Women in Science

  • [I am an amateur on this subject, but these authors are professionals!]
  • Grinstein, L.S., and P.J. Campbell. 1987. Women of Mathematics : a Biobibliographic Sourcebook. Greenwood Press, NY, 292 pp.
  • Grinstein, L.S., Rose, R.K., and Rafailovich, M.H., eds. 1993. Women in Chemistry and Physics: a Biobibliographic Sourcebook. Greenwood Press, Westport, CT, 721 pp. [biographies of 75 women chemists and physicists plus bibliographies of works by and about them]
  • Grinstein, L.S., C.A. Biermann and R.K. Rose, eds. 1997. Women in the Biological Sciences: A Biobibliographic Sourcebook. Greenwood Press, Westport, CT, 609 pp. ["profiles the life and work of 65 representative women from different countries and eras" and includes listings by place of birth, place of work, and scientific field, as well as references to other sources on these women. See book review by S. Rosser, 1998 for a summary.]
  • Holman, P., and R.D. Apple, eds. (P.H. Weisbard, general ed., with S.E. Searing and L. Shult). 1993.
  • The History of Women and Science, Health, and Technology: a Bibliographic Guide to the Professions and the Disciplines, Second Edition. University of Wisconsin System Women’s Studies Librarian, Madison, WI, 100 pp. available online from: http://www.library.wisc.edu/libraries/WomensStudies/bibliogs/hws/hws.htm
  • Ogilvie, M.B., with K.L. Meek. 1996. Women and Science: An Annotated Bibliography. Garland Publishing, Inc., New York, 556 pp.

last modified: August 24, 2009

Corrections, changes, additions? Please contact: etaylor@ku.edu.

Dr. Edith L. Taylor
Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
University of Kansas
Lawrence, KS 66045-7534 USA


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